Journal Articles by CSHE Scholars

Home » Publications Scholarly Communication: Cultural Context, Evolving Models

Diane Harley
2013

Despite predictions that emerging technologies will transform how research is conducted, disseminated, and rewarded, why do we see so little actual shift in how scholars in the most competitive and aspirant institutions actually disseminate their research? I describe research on faculty values and needs in scholarly communication that confirm a number of conservative tendencies in publishing. These tendencies, influenced by tenure and promotion requirements, as well as disciplinary cultures, have both positive and negative consequences.

Why are research universities going global?

Richard Edelstein
John Aubrey Douglass
2013

Despite the significant increase in the number and type of international activities – from branch campuses to MOOCs and aggressive international student recruitment – many institutional efforts appear to be launched without a clear idea of best practices or how specific activities might be productive and meaningful for a particular institution. 

Empirical knowledge of how and why institutions expand these activities, and whether they are successful, remains largely anecdotal. 

THE EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM TO STIMULATE COMPETITIVE RESEARCH

2013

The primary federal program designed to ensure that all states are capable of participating the nation's research enterprise fall under the general rubric of the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCOR). The National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Energy, Department of Agriculture, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration have active EPSCOR programs.

Minority Undergraduate Programs Intended to Increase Participation in Biomedical Careers

Anne J. Mac Lachlan
2012

This article reviews a selection of undergraduate programs intended to increase successful minority participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors, potentially leading to biomedical careers. The object is to examine their structure, consider how well they address the issues of the target population, and assess the extent to which they have met/meet their goals. As a means of conducting this review, the first step is to examine the concepts used as the building blocks for program design.

Socio-cultural barriers and affordances for data sharing and citation standards and practices: Issues of time, credit, and peer review

Diane Harley
2012

I will be speaking today as an anthropologist who has spent a large part of the last decade thinking deeply about and conducting research on issues of scholarly communication, the future of publishing, and academic values and traditions in a digital age. I am a social science scholar. I am not an advocate for particular approaches nor an administrator or librarian.

Credit, time, and personality: The human challenges to sharing scholarly work using Web 2.0

Sophia Krzys Acord
Diane Harley
2013

Funding bodies, the economics of publishing, and the affordances of Web 2.0 platforms have spurred learned societies, publishers, and scholars to experiment with new media venues for scholarly communication. Why, then, have we seen few wide-spread changes in how scholars disseminate research in most disciplines? Drawing on qualitative interview data from the Mellon-funded Future of Scholarly Communication Project (2005-2011), we describe how scholars share their work-in-progress and the disciplinary values driving these practices.

To Judge International Branch Campuses, We Need to Know Their Goals

John Aubrey Douglass
Richard J. Edelstein
2012

The international branch campus phenomenon is relatively new, generating much news coverage and capturing the interest of many university presidents. But what is a branch campus? What kind of impact does it have on the home university in terms of its core functions of teaching and learning, research, and service to the larger society and the world? Does it change the campus culture and operations back home?

The Learning Outcomes Race: the Value of Self-Reported Gains in Large Research Universities

John Aubrey Douglass
Gregg Thomson
Chun-Mei Zhao
2012

Throughout the world, measuring “learning outcomes” is viewed by many stakeholders as a relatively new method to judge the “value added” of colleges and universities. The potential to accurately measure learning gains is also a diagnostic tool for institutional self-improvement. This essay discussed the marketisation of learning outcomes tests, and the relative merits of student experience surveys in gauging learning outcomes by analyzing results from the University of California’s Undergraduate Experience Survey (Student Experience in the Research University Survey: SERU-S).