Higher Education Researchers Workgroup

The goal of this group is to bring together qualitative and quantitative higher education researchers working on issues at Berkeley, the University of California, the State of California or elsewhere for the mutual exchange of knowledge, ideas and issues through:
  • Acquainting one another with their respective research
  • Discussing our research strategies, data base use and data issues
  • Engaging with the questions raised by all of our work
  • Supporting each others’ work by providing feedback on substance and presentation
  • Creating an ongoing list of projects past and present for eventual posting on the CSHE website

Format

  • Monthly meetings for an hour and a half
  • At every meeting a check in with new and existing members about their project(s)
  • When possible prior to each meeting an abstract, proposal, raw summary, finished or draft piece should be circulated among the group
  • At the meeting the author informally presents a summary of his or her research questions and issues and does not necessarily make a formal presentation—this is research in progress
  • Depending on the consensus of the group pertinent articles by non-members could be circulated and discussed for the issues germane to the participants
Too often higher education data driven researchers on and off campus work alone and they are unfamiliar with the breadth of research even on the Berkeley campus. There also is not necessarily communication among qualitative and quantitative researchers although many researchers use both types of data. Additionally there often is a disciplinary divide. This group is intended to overcome these to the enrichment of all participants. All are welcome including international visiting scholars who may be working on higher education issues in their own country. 

Meeting Details

Higher Education Researchers Workgroup 
First Friday of every month by Zoom
Graduate students and postdocs are particularly encouraged to attend.

Contact

This workgroup is organized and chaired by CSHE Senior Researcher Emerita, Anne MacLachlan
For more information regarding this workgroup please contact Anne at maclach@berkeley.edu.

Past Presentations

Immigrant Age-at-Arrival, Social Capital, and College Enrollment

Immigrant Age-at-Arrival, Social Capital, and College Enrollment

Driving the present study is the largely understudied college information search process among immigrant youth, defined as those who are foreign born and who came to the US under the age of 18 (often termed the 1.5 generation). The search process is when students seek out multiple sources for information about college (i.e., social capital resources). Understanding mechanisms that impact immigrant youths’ educational attainment will inform educational policy and practitioners, such as high school counselors, as well as helping to increase immigrant youths’ attainment. Using nationally representative data from the High School Longitudinal Study: 2009, this study analyzes immigrant students’ college enrollment outcomes three years after high school completion and contributes to the literature by disaggregating foreign-born students into age-at-arrival groups. Findings indicate that, contrary to theory, age-at-arrival does not predict college-going. Additionally, access to social capital resources does not predict college-going among immigrant youth, where for example, speaking to a high school counselor about college-going does not significantly improve later arrivals’ college enrollment. I conclude by discussing the possible role of college-focused conversation content (unobserved here), timing of such conversations, and selectivity influences. I also briefly discuss next research steps. 

Next Meeting

May 6, 2022

12-1:30pm

Opportunities and Constraints: Governing International Student Mobility in Times of Transition: A Comparison of German and British Policy

In this presentation, I compare how Germany and the United Kingdom (UK) have governed international student mobility (ISM) over the last two decades. Although both are among the most popular destinations for international students and have experienced similar political trajectories during this period, they have pursued quite different policies to regulate ISM. Driven by educational universalism and fears of future labor shortage, Germany offers financial benefits and generous right to stay opportunities. The UK, by contrast, combines high tuition fees with restrictive immigration policies. Drawing on a range of policy documents and expert interviews, I argue that much of this divergence roots in the different politicizability of ISM: In Germany international students are treated as students (belonging to the non-politicized field of education), but in the UK as internationals (belonging to the hyper-politicized field of immigration).

Marco Bitschnau holds a B.A. in Sociology, Politics, and Economics from Zeppelin University, an MPhil in Sociology from the University of Cambridge, and a Certificate in International Affairs and Strategy from Sciences Po Paris. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Neuchâtel and a visiting researcher at UC Berkeley’s Center for Studies in Higher Education.

To register for this or other events in this group, contact Anne MacLachlan at: maclach@berkeley.edu

Get Ready: Introducing the Millions of Adults Planning to Enroll in College

Get Ready: Introducing the Millions of Adults Planning to Enroll in College

COVID-19 Impacts on Early Career Trajectories and Mobility of Doctoral Graduates in Aotearoa, NZ

COVID-19 Impacts on Early Career Trajectories and Mobility of Doctoral Graduates in Aotearoa, NZ

Asymmetric Expectations: Faculty Research Roles Under California’s Master Plan for Higher Education

Asymmetric Expectations: Faculty Research Roles Under California’s Master Plan for Higher Education

Student Learning and Wellbeing during the Pandemic: Evidence from the SERU COVID-19 Survey

Student Learning and Wellbeing during the Pandemic: Evidence from the SERU COVID-19 Survey

Academic Freedom

Higher Education Researchers Workgroup: Academic Freedom

Can We Ever Forgive Joseph Le Conte?—The Challenge of Names on UC Berkeley's Buildings

Can we ever forgive Joseph Le Conte?—The Challenge of Names on UC Berkeley's Buildings