Graduate Education

Anne MacLachlan

Research Associate and Visiting Scholars Coordinator

Anne J. MacLachlan is a retired senior researcher at CSHE who continues to be devoted to increasing access, persistence, and success in postsecondary education for underrepresented groups (URM) including domestic minorities, women, and those from uneducated/poor families with an emphasis on those in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Her research areas cover the spectrum of postsecondary populations including community college and transfer students, undergraduates in general, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty.

Marc Torka

Research associate, Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney (Australia) and WZB Berlin Social Science Center

Marc is a sociologist of higher education, science and the profession. His general interest is how, if at all, institutional changes impact on the practice of academic and professional work. His current research project 'International comparison of doctoral training practices' compares practices of doctoral research and supervision in the social sciences and physics within the German chair, Australian lecturer and US graduate school system.

Ding-Jo Currie, Ph.D.

Distinguished Faculty, Higher Education Leadership California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, California; Former Chancellor, Coast Community College District – Costa Mesa, California

Dr. Ding-Jo H. Currie’s career includes 30-plus years in the California Community College system with eight additional years in the California State University system.  Ding-Jo retired in 2011 from Coast Community College District where she served as Chancellor. She also served as President of Coastline Community College prior to her Chancellor role.  Currently, Ding-Jo is serving as Distinguished Faculty at CSU Fullerton and devotes herself in full-time leadership development work.

Cristina Gonzalez

Professor Emerita, School of Education, UC Davis

Education

Ph.D., Spanish – Indiana University, Bloomington – 1981

Gary Matkin

Dean of Continuing Education, University of California, Irvine

Dean, Continuing Education, Distance Learning, and Summer Session

  • Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1989, Education
  • M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley, 1970, Political Aspects of Business
  • B.S., University of San Francisco, 1966, Accounting
  • Certified Public Accountant (inactive), 1966, California License E14426

Other Experience

  • Associate Dean, CE, UC Berkeley 1990-2000
  • Director, Admin Services, UC Berkeley 1975-1990
  • Business Officer, UC Berkeley 1973-1975

Maresi Nerad

SERU Senior Researcher, Professor Emerita, Higher Education, University of Washington, Seattle

Maresi Nerad is the founding director of the Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education (CIRGE) and a full Professor (tenured) for Higher Education, in the Leadership in Higher Education Program, College of Education, at the University of Washington, Seattle.  A native of Germany, Dr. Nerad received her doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley; directed research in the central Graduate Division of UC Berkeley, served as Dean in Residence at the Council of Graduate Schools, D.C., and as Associate Dean of the UW central Graduate School.

Degrees of Change: How New Kinds of Professional Doctorates are Changing Higher Education Institutions, by Ami Zusman

Ami Zusman
2013

Over the past fifteen years, new types of "professional practice" doctorates in fields ranging from nursing to bioethics have increased exponentially, from near zero to over 500 programs in at least a dozen fields in the U.S. today. This growth raises many policy questions. For example, do doctorate holders serve their clients and organizations more effectively? How do new credential requirements affect access to these professions? How are they shaping institutional missions, pressures, and resource allocation?

Preservation of Educational Inequality in Doctoral Education: Tacit Knowledge, Implicit Bias and University Faculty, by Anne J. MacLachlan

Anne MacLachlan
2017

Making doctoral education accessible and successful for students from low income, first generation families as well as members of immigrant or specific ethnic groups is a world- wide problem. In the US the traditional explanation for the low numbers of Ph.D. recipients from these groups are lack of preparation, lack of interest and a “leaky pipeline.” These alone are not enough to explain disparities. This article argues that the most powerful vehicles of exclusion are tacit knowledge and the implicit bias of faculty and is related to doctoral/faculty socialization.

Developing Graduate Students of Color for the Professoriate in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), by Anne J. MacLachlan

Anne J. MacLachlan
2006

This paper presents part of the results of a completed study entitled A Longitudinal Study of Minority Ph.D.s from 1980-1990: Progress and Outcomes in Science and Engineering at the University of California during Graduate School and Professional Life. It focuses particularly on the graduate school experience and degree of preparation for the professoriate of African American doctoral students in the sciences and engineering, and presents the results of a survey of 33 African American STEM Ph.D.s from the University of California earned between 1980-1990.